cookies in php | jquery autocomplete example | banners με php | auto share facebook | php adodb to xml sub group
 


 

How To Create Fast And Reliable Backup Using Rsnapshot


How To Create Fast And Reliable Backup Using Rsnapshot

Image source: Tube train



rsync is probably the most common solution for backup on Linux, because it is extremely fast and makes incremental backups (transfer "only differences" between two versions of a file), which is extremely useful in network backups.

However, synchronization (sync) a folder to a backup device, is far from being considered "backup", as it does not keep old versions of files. The problem is solved with rsync as described in the famous article Easy Automated Snapshot-Style Backups with Linux and Rsync, by Mike Rubel.

rsnapshot offers this functionality, using rsync and perl:

  • based on settings (interval) it creates folders (snapshots) like daily.0, daily.1, daily.2 etc weekly.0, weekly.1, weekly.2 etc (keeping daily backup for 7 days, 4 weeks, six months etc)
  • it uses hard links (must be supported by the operating system) for the files that have not changed over the time, in order to consume less disk space
  • it provides a very friendly interface where all files in a snapshot are available using just a file manager (making restore incredibly easy compared to any other backup solutions)
  • files were changed are saved again (does not save differences). From this perspective, it can be considered differential backup solution. However, if you lose a snapshot, a next one which contains hard links to lost snapshot, is practically useless (typical situation in incremental backup solutions)
  • it is simple, fast and reliable

You cannot use Amazon S3 (or similar services) with rsnapshot. This is a remarkable limitation. In this case you can use Duplicity.

Disk usage

To determine the actual space occupied by files in a rsnapshot tree, using du (disk usage) as following:

du -csh /backup/rsnapshot/*

The result is:

254G	/store/backup_athena/rsnapshot/daily.0
26G	  /store/backup_athena/rsnapshot/daily.1
18G	  /store/backup_athena/rsnapshot/daily.10
494M	/store/backup_athena/rsnapshot/daily.11
643M	/store/backup_athena/rsnapshot/daily.12
545M	/store/backup_athena/rsnapshot/daily.13
9.5G	/store/backup_athena/rsnapshot/daily.2
9.3G	/store/backup_athena/rsnapshot/daily.3
9.4G	/store/backup_athena/rsnapshot/daily.4
9.5G	/store/backup_athena/rsnapshot/daily.5
728M	/store/backup_athena/rsnapshot/daily.6
646M	/store/backup_athena/rsnapshot/daily.7
761M	/store/backup_athena/rsnapshot/daily.8
561M	/store/backup_athena/rsnapshot/daily.9
40G	  /store/backup_athena/rsnapshot/monthly.0
709M	/store/backup_athena/rsnapshot/weekly.0
718M	/store/backup_athena/rsnapshot/weekly.1
1.5G	/store/backup_athena/rsnapshot/weekly.2
382G	total

daily.1 folder contains all the files of daily.0 as hard links and some even.

However, using du as following:

du -csh /backup/rsnapshot/daily.1

you will get:

254G	/store/backup_athena/rsnapshot/daily.1
254G	total

Install rsnapshot

Debian/Ubuntu

sudo apt-get install rsnapshot

Redhat/Fedora

yum install rsnapshot

Archlinux

pacman -S rsnapshot

Configure rsnapshot

CAUTION: in rsnapshot.conf parameters and their values must be separated by a tab (eg cmd_cp → /bin/cp) and no spaces.

Actually, the basic settings are:

  • snapshot_root position on the disk where the backup is saved (snapshot tree)
  • interval how many snapshots are kept
  • backup which files will be backup

Edit configuration file:

nano /etc/rsnapshot.conf

configure (using your own values):

#################################################
# rsnapshot.conf - rsnapshot configuration file #
#################################################
#                                               #
# PLEASE BE AWARE OF THE FOLLOWING RULE:        #
#                                               #
# This file requires tabs between elements      #
#                                               #
#################################################

#######################
# CONFIG FILE VERSION #
#######################

config_version  1.2

###########################
# SNAPSHOT ROOT DIRECTORY #
###########################

# All snapshots will be stored under this root directory.
#
snapshot_root   /store/rsnapshot/

# If no_create_root is enabled, rsnapshot will not automatically create the
# snapshot_root directory. This is particularly useful if you are backing
# up to removable media, such as a FireWire or USB drive.
#
no_create_root  1


#########################################
#           BACKUP INTERVALS            #
# Must be unique and in ascending order #
# i.e. hourly, daily, weekly, etc.      #
#########################################

#
# Please note that 'interval' directive is
# a deprecated alias for 'retain'
# so, instead of:
#
##interval	hourly	6
#interval	daily	14
#interval	weekly	4
#interval	monthly	6

#
# it is better to use:
#
#retain	hourly	6
retain	daily	14
retain	weekly	4
retain	monthly	6


############################################
#              GLOBAL OPTIONS              #
# All are optional, with sensible defaults #
############################################

# Verbose level, 1 through 5.
# 1     Quiet           Print fatal errors only
# 2     Default         Print errors and warnings only
# 3     Verbose         Show equivalent shell commands being executed
# 4     Extra Verbose   Show extra verbose information
# 5     Debug mode      Everything
#
verbose     4

# Same as "verbose" above, but controls the amount of data sent to the
# logfile, if one is being used. The default is 3.
# If you want the rsync output, you have to set it to 4
#
loglevel    5

# If you enable this, data will be written to the file you specify. The
# amount of data written is controlled by the "loglevel" parameter.
#
logfile    /var/log/rsnapshot.log


###############################
### BACKUP POINTS / SCRIPTS ###
###############################

# LOCALHOST
backup	/home/  .
backup	/etc/   .
backup	/data/  .

...

Exclude files

Please read rsync documentation for:

--exclude=PATTERN       exclude files matching PATTERN
--exclude-from=FILE     read exclude patterns from FILE

You may use a file which contains all your exclude patterns:

############################################
#              GLOBAL OPTIONS              #
# All are optional, with sensible defaults #
############################################

# The include_file and exclude_file parameters, if enabled, simply get
# passed directly to rsync. Please look up the --include-from and
# --exclude-from options in the rsync man page for more details.
#

exclude_file   /path/to/exclude/file

However, you may define exclude patters for each backup point. Here is an example:

###############################
### BACKUP POINTS / SCRIPTS ###
###############################

backup  /etc/ ./  exclude=mtab
backup  /data/  ./ exclude=data/.Trash-1000,exclude=data/lost+found

Remote rsnapshot backups

It is not a good idea to mount remote shares with samba or cifs. Rsnapshot will not work properly (rsync cannot create hard links in this case). However, you may use nfs to mount remote shares.

But, the common case is to use ssh for remote rsnapshot backups, using root account. You have to use RSA key authentication (without passphrase in most cases). In untrusted networks DO NOT expose root account, use a backup user with advanced privileges (for example, modify sudoers file to permit rsync command without password for this user).

You cannot set the snapshot_root to a remote SSH path. In other words, you cannot push backups to a remote server. You can pull them locally from a remote server.

Uncomment cmd_ssh in rsnapshot.conf

#################################
# EXTERNAL PROGRAM DEPENDENCIES #
#################################

# Uncomment this to enable remote ssh backups over rsync.
#
cmd_ssh /usr/bin/ssh

Here is an example of backup points

###############################
### BACKUP POINTS / SCRIPTS ###
###############################

backup  root@192.168.1.51:/etc/ my-remote1/
backup  root@192.168.1.51:/data/    my-remote1/ exclude=data/.Trash-1000,exclude=data/lost+found

Check settings

Use:

rsnapshot configtest

If there are no mistakes

Syntax OK

Dry run (testing)

rsnapshot -t daily

Run rsnapshot

To run rsnapshot use:

rsnapshot hourly

or

rsnapshot daily

or

rsnapshot weekly

or

rsnapshot monthly

or a combination of the above.

These commands can be called

  • via script (more compatible with workstations) or
  • via cron job (more compatible with servers because they run continuously)

Script example

The following script performs:

  • rsnapshot daily whenever called
  • rsnapshot weekly first time with the completion of daily backups (based on rdaily interval) and then every 7 times which is executed
  • rsnapshot monthly first time with the completion of the daily and weekly backups (based on rdaily and rweekly interval) and then every 30 times which is executed

Whenever it is executed, it increases a counter in rsnapshot_counter file.

Script code - MIT License

#!/usr/bin/env bash

# parameters
rdaily=14
rweekly=4
rsnapshot_counter="/root/scripts/rsnapshot_counter"

# create rsnapshot counter if not exist
if [ ! -f $rsnapshot_counter ]; then echo "0" > $rsnapshot_counter; fi

# increase counter
rc=`cat $rsnapshot_counter`
rc=$(expr $rc + 1)
echo $rc > $rsnapshot_counter

# check for weekly intervals
tmp1=$(expr $rc - $rdaily)
if [ $tmp1 -ge 0 ]; then week_limit=$(expr $tmp1 % 7); else week_limit=-1; fi

# check for monthly intervals
tmp2=$(expr $rweekly - 1)
tmp3=$(expr $tmp2 \* 7)
tmp4=$(expr $tmp1 - $tmp3)
if [ $tmp4 -ge 0 ]; then month_limit=$(expr $tmp4 % 30); else month_limit=-1; fi

# run rsnapshot
rsnapshot daily
if [ $week_limit -eq 0 ]; then rsnapshot weekly; fi
if [ $month_limit -eq 0 ]; then rsnapshot monthly; fi

Cron job example

As root, create a cron job:

nano /etc/cron.d/rsnapshot

you may use

0 */4         * * *           root    /usr/bin/rsnapshot hourly
30 3          * * *           root    /usr/bin/rsnapshot daily
0  3          * * 1           root    /usr/bin/rsnapshot weekly
30 2          1 * *           root    /usr/bin/rsnapshot monthly

These settings perform:

  • rsnapshot hourly every four hours (starting at 00:00)
  • rsnapshot daily every day at 3:30
  • rsnapshot weekly every Monday at 03:00
  • rsnapshot monthly every 1st of the month at 02:30

Related Posts

You may also be interested in

Εγγραφή!
Sign-up for our free email newsletter. Get updates when new tutorials and tips are published. You can unsubscribe anytime with a click.

Your comments are welcomed!

This site actively encourages commenting on any post. Comments are not pre-moderated, but this community does not tolerate direct or indirect attacks, name-calling or insults. Please, read terms of use and Comment Policy at privacy policy.

Update Postgres Major Version in Debian Jessie How to Remove Old Kernels in Debian and Ubuntu